October 4, 2014

amnhnyc:

Looking to do some leaf peeping this weekend? It’s always peak fall at the American Museum of Natural History! Check out our new Pinterest board, Autumn at the Museum for a selection of our seasonal dioramas and exhibition items. 

October 1, 2012
amnhnyc:

How do you re-create the moon shadows seen on a snowy December night?
That was the challenge artist Stephen C. Quinn faced when new energy-efficient lights were installed in the wolf diorama, creating new shadows that weren’t consistent with the scene. Find out how he did it in this video. 
Image © AMNH/R. Mickens

amnhnyc:

How do you re-create the moon shadows seen on a snowy December night?

That was the challenge artist Stephen C. Quinn faced when new energy-efficient lights were installed in the wolf diorama, creating new shadows that weren’t consistent with the scene. Find out how he did it in this video

Image © AMNH/R. Mickens

September 30, 2012
floresenelatico:

Alois Kronschlaeger. Moose Diorama

Art + Dioramas = Better Art. From the artist’s description “Utilizing the habitat dioramas in the Mammal Hall of the former Grand Rapids Public Museum, I have created a site-specific installation, juxtaposing the existing landscapes of 27 dioramas built in the mid-20th century with contemporary architectural intervention. By doing so, I explore what happens in an environment when overlaying a geometric abstraction onto representational yet “virtual” spaces.”

floresenelatico:

Alois KronschlaegerMoose Diorama

Art + Dioramas = Better Art. From the artist’s description “Utilizing the habitat dioramas in the Mammal Hall of the former Grand Rapids Public Museum, I have created a site-specific installation, juxtaposing the existing landscapes of 27 dioramas built in the mid-20th century with contemporary architectural intervention. By doing so, I explore what happens in an environment when overlaying a geometric abstraction onto representational yet “virtual” spaces.”

(via lu--lu)

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Filed under: art reblog diorama 
September 21, 2012
amnhnyc:

“…These really are considered the best in the world” says artist and naturalist Stephen C. Quinn of the stunning dioramas in the Museum’s Hall of North American Mammals. 
An expert team of conservators and Museum artists led a masterful restoration of this historic hall, which first opened in 1942. Preview the incredible work that has gone into these dioramas in this video and join us when the hall officially reopens on October 27. 
Image © AMNH/D. Finnin

Great video!

amnhnyc:

“…These really are considered the best in the world” says artist and naturalist Stephen C. Quinn of the stunning dioramas in the Museum’s Hall of North American Mammals. 

An expert team of conservators and Museum artists led a masterful restoration of this historic hall, which first opened in 1942. Preview the incredible work that has gone into these dioramas in this video and join us when the hall officially reopens on October 27

Image © AMNH/D. Finnin

Great video!

September 11, 2012
suchi:

F-32_1 (by Hamamatsu Diorama Factory)

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind diorama

suchi:

F-32_1 (by Hamamatsu Diorama Factory)

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind diorama

(via kiyo)

August 7, 2012
amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff install oversize models in a diorama depicting the forest floor, March 1958
Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp
© AMNH Library/Image #325494

amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff install oversize models in a diorama depicting the forest floor, March 1958

Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp

© AMNH Library/Image #325494

March 9, 2012
One of my favorites. From the California Academy of Sciences

One of my favorites. From the California Academy of Sciences

February 27, 2012
via fashionableanimals
Those look like snub nosed monkeys, right? I think so.
Also, Dioramas has 300 posts sitting here waiting to go up. But I’m busy, and you don’t want your dashboard spammed. So we’re taking it slow and easy for a while.

via fashionableanimals

Those look like snub nosed monkeys, right? I think so.

Also, Dioramas has 300 posts sitting here waiting to go up. But I’m busy, and you don’t want your dashboard spammed. So we’re taking it slow and easy for a while.

February 13, 2012
No info, but love it!

No info, but love it!

(Source: xannabelx)

January 10, 2012

yycstudio:

Dioramas WITH Mind Control!

These are actually digitally created/rendered. But they’re beautiful, and I love me some artistic conversations about the definitions of the real. So I’m going to call them dioramas, and hope you find them as mind blowing as I do.

December 23, 2011
The Great Wall by Guy Laramee. A beautiful landscape constructed from books, with a fascinating story. From the artist’s site:
"Having recently overthrown the American Empire in the 23rd century, the Chinese Empire set out to chronicle the history of the Great Panics during the 21st and 22nd centuries.
This Herculean undertaking resulted in a historiographical masterwork entitled, The Great Wall. Comprising 100 volumes, this encyclopaedia derives its name from The Great Wall of America, a monumental project to build an impregnable wall around the United States of America so as to protect this land from barbarian invasions. 150 years in the making, this wall ultimately isolated Americans from the rest of the world while sapping the country’s remaining cultural and natural resources. It also undermined the American people’s confidence in systematized hedonism, thus hastening the fall of the American Empire. As we now know this paved the way for China to invade American territory.
The Chinese Empire later ordered a group of scribes to write The Great Wall series. In the course of their duties they familiarized themselves with the libraries of the former USA. Through a strange twist of fate they thereby discovered the ancient sources of their own civilization which the new Middle Kingdom had long ago removed from its libraries. In the end this contact, primarily with Taoism and Chan (Zen) Buddhism, sowed the seeds of the Chinese Empire’s”

The Great Wall by Guy Laramee. A beautiful landscape constructed from books, with a fascinating story. From the artist’s site:

"Having recently overthrown the American Empire in the 23rd century, the Chinese Empire set out to chronicle the history of the Great Panics during the 21st and 22nd centuries.

This Herculean undertaking resulted in a historiographical masterwork entitled, The Great Wall. Comprising 100 volumes, this encyclopaedia derives its name from The Great Wall of America, a monumental project to build an impregnable wall around the United States of America so as to protect this land from barbarian invasions. 150 years in the making, this wall ultimately isolated Americans from the rest of the world while sapping the country’s remaining cultural and natural resources. It also undermined the American people’s confidence in systematized hedonism, thus hastening the fall of the American Empire. As we now know this paved the way for China to invade American territory.

The Chinese Empire later ordered a group of scribes to write The Great Wall series. In the course of their duties they familiarized themselves with the libraries of the former USA. Through a strange twist of fate they thereby discovered the ancient sources of their own civilization which the new Middle Kingdom had long ago removed from its libraries. In the end this contact, primarily with Taoism and Chan (Zen) Buddhism, sowed the seeds of the Chinese Empire’s”

October 26, 2011
Exurbia, by Nelly Blaya.

Exurbia, by Nelly Blaya.

(via cinoh-deactivated20120915)

October 18, 2011

newyorker:

James Casebere’s photographs of handmade, spare environments speak to a preoccupation with suburban architecture and domestic interiors. His habitats are entirely void of people, which only adds to their creepy charm. This fall, a new survey of his work to date is coming out. See more of Casebere’s creations here: http://ow.ly/70Qw9

October 6, 2011

fuckyeahdioramas:

tumblr user (and poet/author) SaintAdrienne thought this would be appropriate, seeing as I can now post again because of a new iMac.  I agree!  Personal Shoebox Apple Store! (via Frensleven)

Reblogging this miniature Apple Store diorama, for Steve.

October 4, 2011

sunsatskippy:

Deer and elk at the Chicago Field Museum this past winter.

(Source: skippylynn)